Jan Van Eyck portrait of man(self portrait) 1433 london, national gallery.
-Brandon Johnson
The medium of the painting is oil on oak. I believe the focal point of the paiting is the red turbin on the mans’ head. The texture of the painting shows a smooth glazed look.

Jan Van Eyck portrait of man(self portrait) 1433 london, national gallery.

-Brandon Johnson

The medium of the painting is oil on oak. I believe the focal point of the paiting is the red turbin on the mans’ head. The texture of the painting shows a smooth glazed look.

Watts Towers

by Shakera Lawson

i wonder how many people would be fascinated to visit the watts tower and do and photgraphy album on it from diffrent angels on it and then mayb make it into a colloge to make it look like somethign else?

the preacher

by shakera Lawson

the picture seem to have a texture form the type of paper used a littl ruff. the picture is very represenational. i feel emotion from it pain  mostly of heartache preferbly just taken that hes black and things wasnt always easy for blacks!

The Treachery of Images (La trahison des images

by Shakera Lawson

      this picture is very realistic. i feel that i can stick my hand in the picture and use it. it doesnt seem like only a painting its so smooth looking and represential. i believe when painted it was a mood of an aged person having quality time with himself possibly and male.

the pipe

by Shakera Lawson

The artist used emphasis in this picture to let you know that the pipe is the focal point. He also made you think by the title of his piece “This Is Not A Pipe”. Until you really analyze the piece you won’t know that it is a picture of a pipe and not just a pipe

Watts Towers

by Shakera Lawson

          
The Watts Towers are one of only nine works of folk art listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The site is one of only four US National Historic Landmarks in the city of Los Angeles. The site is now a unit of California State Parks and managed by the Los Angeles City Cultural Affairs Department.

Watts Towers

by Shakera Lawson

               Two of the towers rise to a height of nearly 100 feet. The sculptures are constructed from steel pipes and rods, wrapped with wire mesh, coated with mortar, and embedded with pieces of porcelain, tile and glass. Using simple hand tools and cast off materials (broken glass, sea shells, generic pottery and ceramic tile) Italian immigrant, Simon Rodia spent 30 years (1921 to 1955) building a tribute to his adopted country and a monument to the spirit of individuals who make their dreams tangible.

Watts Towers

by Shakera Lawson

The Watts Towers, consisting of seventeen major sculptures constructed of structural steel and covered with mortar, are the work of one man - Simon Rodia. Rodia, born Sabato Rodia in Ribottoli, Italy in 1879, was known by a variety of names including Don Simon, Simon Rodilla, Sam and Simon. Although his neighbors in watts knew him as “Sam Rodilla”, the official name of his work is “the Watts Towers of Simon Rodia”.thats how the towers got there name.

Charles White- Preacher

I feel the emphasis of the painting is the preacher and his facial expression to the audience. The colors also emphases the painting by giving it an old traditional look.

-Brandon Johnson

More About Feast of Gods

The Feast of Godswas a product of the Italian Renaissance, a time of unprecedented creativity and discovery throughout Europe. Voyages to new and distant lands brought trade and unimagined wealth. In the east, the sacking of Constantinople by the Turks in 1453 brought scholars, and their ancient texts, to Europe, inspiring a re-discovery of the classical past of Greece and Rome. It was a time of new knowledge-astronomers, for example, showed that the planets revolved not about the earth but about the sun and the invention of printing disseminated the new knowledge. Such changes affected man’s thinking about himself, his past, his world, and his place in the world. This period 1300-1600 which marks the transition between medieval and modern times, is identified as “The Renaissance.”